“The secret to successful negotiations is not just preparation and a good plan, but inspired improvisation. So far, there has never been a book on this important and neglected aspect of negotiation, but we now, thanks to Mike Wheeler, have a beautifully written, uplifting and practical guide to the “jazz” of negotiation. The art of negotiation is a real jewel and an essential contribution to literature! “Professor Wheeler is creatively moving into very different professions, such as NASCAR drivers, jazz musicians and improv players, broadening our awareness of negotiations and equipping us with practical and innovative tools to deal with complex negotiations. “Getting to Yes meets `Round Midnight` in this very readable exploration of the twists and turns of real-life negotiations. In his new book “The Art of Negotiation,” Michael Wheeler offers great practical advice for dealing with the unpredictable possibilities of not staying in the negotiation scenario. “The book is a good basic guide to getting the most out of a negotiation. A member of Harvard Law School`s world-renowned negotiation program presents the next generation approach to negotiation. A member of Harvard Law School`s world-renowned negotiation program presents the next generation approach to negotiation. Two approaches to negotiation have prevailed for many years: the “win-win” method, illustrated in Getting to Yes by Roger Fisher, William Ury and Bruce Patton; and Herb Cohens` negotiating style You Can Negotiate Anything. Today, Harvard Business School award-winning Professor Michael Wheeler offers a dynamic alternative to one-size-fits-all strategies that don`t match real-world realities. The art of negotiation shows how negotiators thrive in the face of chaos and insecurity. They don`t make up for it with rigid plans.

Instead, they view negotiation as a process of exploration that requires continuous learning, adaptation, and influence. Their agility allows them to get along if others are stuck. Michael Wheeler highlights the improvising nature of negotiation, drawing on his own research and work with colleagues at Program on Negotiation. . . .