The formal agreements between Britain, France and Russia consisted of the following eleven letters. I would also like to remind your Excellency that the conclusion of this agreement for practical examination raises the question of Italy`s claims to participate in a partition or reorganization of Turkey in Asia, as stated in Article 9 of the Agreement of 26 April 1915 between Italy and the Allies. On September 15, the British distributed a memorial aid (which had been discussed privately two days earlier between Lloyd George and Clemenceau [103]) that the British would withdraw their troops to Palestine and Mesopotamia and hand over Damascus, Homs, Hama and Aleppo to Faisal`s troops. While accepting the withdrawal, Clemenceau continued to insist on the Sykes-Picot agreement as the basis for all discussions. [104] In the Constantinople Agreement of March 17, 1915, after the start of naval operations, Sergei Sazonov, Russian Foreign Minister, wrote to the ambassadors of France and Great Britain before the Gallipoli campaign and claimed Constantinople and the Dardanelles. During a series of five-week diplomatic talks, Britain and France agreed, under their own claims, on a wider sphere of influence in Iran in the case of Britain and on the annexation of Syria (including Palestine) and Cilicia for France. British and French claims agreed and all parties agreed that the proper management of the holy sites should be left to later regulation. [18] Without the Russian revolutions of 1917, Constantinople and The Strait could have been handed over to Russia after the Allied victory. In April and May, discussions were launched by Sykes on the benefits of a meeting in which Picot and the Arabs were to participate in order to articulate the desiderate of the two sides. At the same time, logistics were managed in relation to the promised revolt and Hussein`s impatience with the measures increased. Finally, at the end of April, McMahon was informed of Sykes-Picot`s terms and he and Grey agreed that they would not be communicated to the Arabs.

[54] [55]:57-60 The agreement was based on the premise that the Triple Entente would succeed in defeating the Ottoman Empire in World War I and was part of a series of secret agreements that preferred its division. . . .