For reasons of public policy, an agreement that restricts the application of its legal rights is not in accordance with the competence of the judicial authorities. These provisions of contract law are generally intended to ensure fairness in the process. It protects the parties from not being unfairly disadvantaged or from entering into a contract contrary to the law of the land. This means, in essence, that any person considered to be acquired under the treaty may be protected against losses if the contract proves, at the option of that party, to be inconclusive or questionable. The basis for the decision to contest a contract at the choice of one of the parties depends on factors such as coercion, misrepresentation, unlawful influence, etc. Since it is one of the parties of choice, the aggrieved party can decide whether or not to invalidate the contract. In addition, it takes a protective approach to contract law, in that it protects individuals from compliance with inappropriate, illegal and immoral obligations of an agreement that can cause them heavy losses. For some people, it is extremely easy to influence other people who might be at a weak point in negotiation and are thus exploited. . . .