Negotiations for a successor itA agreement in 1994 were concluded in 2006 and the new agreement (ITTA 2006) is expected to intensify efforts to promote tropical timber trade in the framework of sustainable tropical forest management. There is a great gap between the principles underlying these provisions and the harsh realities of the agreements that were actually negotiated in the post-war period. The U.S.S.R. continues to vote on the international sugar agreement and the international wheat agreement as an exporting country, although the dynamism of international trade is such that it has recently become a major net importer of both countries. In the present circumstances, the United States, although not itself a member of the ITA, is in fact setting a ceiling for international tin prices by regulating the rate at which tin disposals are produced from that country`s strategic stocks. In the case of wheat, too, the international market was less dominated by IWA than by the oligopolistic pricing practices of the Canadian Wheat Board and the U.S. Commodity Credit Corporation. The membership of a large number of nations in the current international agreements on raw materials can only complicate administrative and decision-making processes, whereas in at least one case – the UK`s decision not to side with the 1953 IWA – the absence of a major wheat-importing country could have had a beneficial effect in moderating the exercise of oligopolistic power. International commodity agreements (IIs) are essentially multilateral instruments of state control that support the international price of certain primary raw materials, notably through agreements such as export quotas or guaranteed market access. As a result, international commodity agreements must be distinguished from commodity study groups that lack fully operational responsibility; international non-governmental cartels; and the Combined Food Board (1942-1945) or the International Materials Conference (1951-1953), which involved international allocentric machines for a considerable number of primary raw materials in times of war-induced shortage. The proposed definition also excludes “close” forms of international commitments: (1) bilateral mass purchase agreements; (2) multilateral market control agreements for industrial products, such as the international cotton textile agreement negotiated in 1961; (3) sectoral integration schemes modelled on the European Coal and Steel Community or the European Economic Community`s Common Agricultural Policy; (4) plans for a commodity reserve currency; (5) proposals for international food reserves; and (6) measures to reduce tariffs or non-tariff restrictions on international trade in goods or services.