UPAA/UPMAA has not been adopted in 22 states, although pre-agreements are still legal in those states: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Vermont, Washington, West, and Wyoming. To date, UPAA/UPMAA has been taken over by 28 states and the District of Columbia: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, North Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin. While the laws enacted by the legal systems adopted by upAA/UPMA have state-to-country differences, this uniform framework of uniform laws has certainly made it much easier for signatories to prepare pre-judicial agreements in accordance with the law by codifying the requirements. In 2012, the Uniform Law Commission enacted the Uniformity and Revision Act of the Union of Human Rights and Human Rights Act (UPMAA), which established procedural and material safeguards for marital agreements to bring them into line with safeguards for pre-marital agreements. [2] The Uniform Premarital Agreement Act (UPAA) is a uniform act that governs marriage contracts, also known as “pre-marital agreements” and “pre-agreements.” [1] It was designed in 1983 by the National Conference of Commissioners on The Laws of the State on Uniform to promote greater uniformity and predictability between state laws with respect to pre-marital agreements in an increasingly temporary society. The UPAA was adopted to ensure that a pre-marriage agreement, effectively concluded in one state, is respected by the courts of another state where a couple could obtain a divorce.